Mid-grade gas will drop from 91 to 90 octane

Weights and Measures officials say they’ll ensure transition is proper

The Franklin County Department of Weights and Measures would like gasoline distributors, retailers and consumers to know that the New Year will also bring some change to the motor fuel industry.

The familiar 91-octane non-ethanol gasoline will soon transition to 90-octane non-ethanol gasoline. The non-ethanol 91-octane gasoline, which is the base product for the 93-octane fuel, is frequently preferred for use by many individuals in two-cycle and older engines not designed for ethanol-added fuels.

Petroleum producers and refiners decided to make this change. In the transition, the county Department of Weights and Measures wants fuel distributors and retailers to know what they need to do.

Distributors must either certify to their customers, in writing, the octane ratings certified to them, or they can certify the octane ratings themselves. Retailers must post octane ratings that are certified to them, or they can certify the octane ratings themselves.

Retailers must label gasoline dispensers to properly identify the new product. Also, 90-octane fuels may not be described as “premium” or “super.” They may, however, be described as “mid-grade” or “plus” for example.

Gasoline storage tanks and fills must also be re-marked and/or labeled, as appropriate, to comply with state Weights and Measures and Department of Environmental Conservation regulations.

As this transition proceeds, Weights and Measures officials say they will examine distributor documentation and inspect retail locations to assure that the necessary notifications and changes are being made.

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