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Read in the Blue Line

A meditation on the Adirondack conundrum

Lorraine Duvall writes well about time and place. In her 2020 “Finding a Woman’s Place: The Story of a 1970s Feminist Commune,” she returned to an Adirondack effort by women who rejected America’s traditional patriarchal structure and created their own self-designed identity. The book ...

A fitting tribute to Saranac Lake

A new book by Skip Murray and Caperton Tissot serves as a very nice paean to the village of Saranac Lake, New York. “Saranac Lake: An Adirondack Portrait,” with its combination of poetry and photography, is clearly a labor of love. Promoted as a record of the community from 2017 through ...

A critical history of Adirondack histories

Still looking for a last-minute gift for that Adirondack history book fan? Following is a critique of some of what’s out there. Unless noted, they can be found either online or in local bookstores. Try a bookstore first — let’s support our communities’ booksellers. The earliest and ...

A true story of glamour and tragedy

Looking for a true story with the 1920s glamour and tragedy of “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald? Check out “American Eve: Evelyn Nesbit, Stanford White, the Birth of the ‘It’ Girl, and the Crime of the Century” by Paula Uruburu, current English Department Chair at Hofstra ...

Spaces that connect us

Karma Brown’s novel “What Wild Women Do” is the story of two women who share the same space, physically and psychologically, almost 50 years apart. In 2021, would-be screenwriter Rowan rents a cabin in the Adirondacks. With Rowan is her fiance, Seth, who has been recording their ...

‘Black Woods’: Stories that deserve to be told

A new non-fiction account by independent historian Amy Godine sheds light on a most interesting, yet frequently overlooked and misunderstood, 19th century chapter in Adirondack history. In “The Black Woods: Pursuing Racial Justice on the Adirondack Frontier,” she tackles the history of ...