Harold Frederick Jaquis

It is with great sadness that we announce the death of Harold Frederick Jaquis, 81, of Lake Clear, on Aug. 17, 2019. He was surrounded by his wife and daughters at the time of his passing.

Harold was born April 22, 1938, at home, to Anna Etta Friend Jaquis and Marion Jaquis. Harold is survived by his loving wife (of 57-plus years) and caregiver Barbara Lee Clark Jaquis, his eldest daughter and caregiver Caron Jaquis-Powers and son-in-law Francis Powers, and youngest daughter and son-in-law Deborah and Scott Dragoon. He is also survived by his only granddaughter, Jennifer Ball and her family. He was blessed to have known his great-grandchildren: Katherine Willett, Nolan Ball, Alivia Balestrino-Ball, and Lilyann and Rosalee Powers. Harold is also survived by his brother and sister-in-law, William and Barbara Joy Jaquis of Pennsylvania, brother-in-law and sister-in-law George and Shirley Townsend of Georgia, and sister-in-law and brother-in law Bonnie and David Porter of Lake Clear. Harold’s special nephews and nieces also survive him and include Michael Townsend, Jeanne Townsend Shannon, Pamela Jaquis Imes, Christopher Jaquis, Kim Webb and Willie Prue, as well as their families. Several cousins also survive him. His brother Dickie Jaquis, his sister Peggy Jaquis Townsend, his brothers-in-law William Clark and Louis Prue, sister-in-law Rose Prue, and nephews William Jaquis Jr. and George Townsend IV predeceased him.

Harold grew up and lived in Lake Clear all his life up until this past year, when he could no longer be taken care of at home. He had no desire to travel, and he would often say, “What would I want to go there for? It won’t amount to anything. It’s too far from Lake Clear.”

He graduated from Saranac Lake High School and ventured to Buffalo to work at the GM plant with his Uncle Marston. He was subsequently drafted into the Army. He was stationed in Fort Dix, New Jersey; France; and Germany. He married Barbara Clark on Dec. 2, 1961. After his discharge, he started his construction career working for Frank Elliott, Charlie Fisher, Branch & Callahan and Tracy Trombley Construction until his retirement. He was an active member of the Carpenters Local 1042 for over 50 years. He also served in the National Guard.

Harold left a legacy throughout the North Country. He was a master carpenter and spent his career building in the Adirondacks. Those who knew him will not only have fond memories, but we will also have some tangibles to share with all the visitors to Lake Placid. Harold and his partner Don Goff worked for Tracy Trombley Construction building structures for the 1980 Olympics. Harold and Don built the Judges’ Tower at the ski jumps. He also was one of the tradesmen workers involved in the construction/erection of the ski jumps.

Harold continued with the Adirondack tradition. He was a caretaker for several Adirondack camps for many years. His carpentry craftsmanship will live on for decades to come. When Harold built something, he built it well. The family home he built for his wife is a prime example of his expertise.

Harold was a teacher, a mentor and a role model for his family and friends. He was always there to help with his daughters’ homework, especially math and including calculus. He often traded his building skills with his many close friends involved in electrical, plumbing and craftsmen trades.

Harold will be remembered well and often. The family would like to thank the Keene Valley Neighborhood House and Tupper Lake Mercy Living Center for his elder care. The staff at both facilities treated Harold with care and dignity, and gave the family comfort in this last phase of his life.

Funeral arrangements are in care of the Fortune-Keough Funeral Home, 20 Church St., Saranac Lake. Friends wishing to remember Harold may join the family at the Fortune-Keough Funeral Home on Thursday, Aug. 22, from 4 to 7 p.m.

A graveside service and burial will be held on Friday, Aug. 23 at 11 a.m. at the Harrietstown Cemetery in Saranac Lake. Luncheon will follow with details provided after the burial.

And he always said he got the last two words, “Yes, Dear.”