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What’s wrong with this picture?

December 24, 2013
Adirondack Daily Enterprise

To the editor:

As the state decision on the unit management plan for the Adirondack travel corridor draws near, one look will tell you what the answer should be.

For weeks now, the corridor would be an excellent trail, providing an entirely new venue for an entire region. While not many would be out riding in the rain, with the pending cold snap and a few flurries, it would be busy with snowmobiles again IF the rails were removed.

Article Photos

Steel rails poking through the rain-reduced snow cover are an obstacle for snowmobiling on the state-owned Remsen-Lake Placid Travel Corridor.
(Photo — Scott S. Thompson)

Any ski hill manager would tell you that a holiday open for business makes up for weeks of regular activity; that would be the story of the rail trail. You might ask what would bring significant numbers of tourists to the area and at the same time provide activity for area visitors, and 91 miles of snow-covered, unplowed, destination trail would be a good answer.

Building a side-by-side trail with the nature of a year-round rail trail is absurd, particularly as the corridor rises from Tupper Lake to the summit at Big Moose (2,000 feet); it is built more and more on high fills and deep cuts exacerbated by wetlands and preserved timber on adjacent lands. Years of thwarted effort for a trail along the side out of Lake Placid should have provided the insight necessary.

There is more you can do than wait. See www.thearta.org for addresses to contact and join us with even a small donation, 100 percent of which will go toward advocating for this important attraction.

Happy holidays to all.

Scott S. Thompson

Norridgewock III

Beaver River

 
 

 

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