Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Customer Service | Tearsheets | Media Kit | Home RSS
 
 
 

Hassig will run again for Congress

September 3, 2013
By SHAUN KITTLE - Staff Writer (skittle@adirondackdailyenterprise.com) , Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Donald Hassig plans to run for Congress again in 2014 as a Green Party candidate for New York state's 21st District.

It will be the second time Hassig has challenged U.S. Rep. Bill Owens, a Democrat from Plattsburgh. Owens has held that seat since 2009. Hassig ran against Owens and Republican Matt Doheny in 2012 but then endorsed Owens three days before Election Day.

Hassig, a Colton resident who leads the advocacy group Cancer Action NY, said he will make the announcement at Jefferson Community College in Watertown.

Article Photos

Donald Hassig
(Enterprise file photo — Chris Morris)

In a press release emailed Sunday, Hassig wrote that his campaign will focus on living "in harmony with fellow humans and the other living beings. (Editor's note: A previous statement that the release was dated Sept. 6 was incorrect; that is the date of the formal announcement in Watertown and was misread by the Enterprise staff.)

"A government that is acting for the betterment of the lives of the vast majority of Americans will protect public health and the Earth by ushering in the days of safe chemical use, sustainable human reproduction, habitat protection and transition to non-combustion energy sources, including solar and wind," Hassig said in the release. "This is good for the Earth and it is good for its people."

In the press release, Hassig also wrote that nothing will change until people regain control of their government.

"I want Congress to be free from corporate control," Hassig wrote. "I will endeavor to accomplish this. I can do a good job of freeing Congress if I am elected."

New York state Green Party co-chair Gloria Mattera said Hassig hasn't contacted any Green Party leaders about his bid, although he doesn't necessarily have to.

"Anybody enrolled in a party can petition to get on the ballot, and they don't have to ask permission from party leadership," Mattera said. "Getting party leadership and support, I think enhances or legitimizes a candidacy. It's surprising to us because most of the people who want to run for office contact us."

 
 

 

I am looking for:
in:
News, Blogs & Events Web