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No night parking next to Lake Placid pub

Village board talks about towing violators

July 31, 2013
By JESSICA COLLIER - Staff Writer (jcollier@adirondackdailyenterprise.com) , Adirondack Daily Enterprise

LAKE PLACID - The village and the Lussi family last week came to an agreement that will let people use parking spots on the property of the family's new Hampton Inn hotel, but only during the day.

The 29 parking spaces on Searle Lane are metered, with one meter currently being used for the whole section of parking. There are three signs - one at each end of the line of parking spots and one in the middle - that note that parking is banned there from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.

At a village board meeting last week, Mayor Craig Randall said the time restrictions were put in place at the Lussis' request.

Article Photos

These 29 parking spots, between Lake Placid’s new Hampton Inn and the Lake Placid Pub and Brewery on Searle Lane, are closed to parking between 8 p.m. and 8 a.m.
(Enterprise photo — Jessica Collier)

"I think their concern in large part is that there's an adjacent property next door that serves alcoholic beverages, and they felt some discomfort with the possibility that late-night partying could create a disturbance to the hotel," Randall said.

Randall said there are three residences down the road that may also be concerned about the noise from the business, the Lake Placid Pub and Brewery.

"It is fully understood that a condition of this license (is) that (the) village vigorously enforce the parking ban between 8 p.m. and 8 a.m. daily," reads the contract signed by the two entities.

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Trustee Peter Holderied said he was there two times recently around 10 p.m. - when parking is prohibited there - and several of the parking spaces were filled, many by locals.

Trustee Jason Leon asked how to denote whether the village is enforcing the parking restrictions vigorously.

Randall said the signage there is clear that parking isn't allowed at night. Village Attorney Janet Bliss said she suspects that some cars are going to need to be towed from the parking area until people learn their lesson. Randall said she's right; that would help people learn not to park there.

Leon said he knows the village doesn't enforce parking like that in other areas of the village. Police generally just ticket people parked overnight in other parking lots, he said.

"I would want the public to be very aware of the consequences of that," Leon said.

Randall said he thinks the village can start by ticketing cars, and hopefully towing won't be necessary.

The village is trying to make up for parking spots lost when the hotel was built, Randall said. The hotel's parking lot used to be used by patrons of the pub and people using the beach across the street.

The contract lasts for two years, but it may be terminated by either party with 90 day's written notice.

Holderied noted that in the past, the Lussis have used boulders to block the parking lot from being used by the public when there were problems. But that couldn't happen for 90 days according to the contract if some problem arises with these parking spots, he said.

Leon said he's concerned about the contract only lasting two years after the village invested money in the space.

Randall agreed, but he said the Lussis' weren't interested in selling the property or selling an easement on it, so this is better than before when nothing was in writing.

It is the village's responsibility to install and maintain the signs and pay stations and manage the parking spots, including plowing and sanding them in the winter.

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Contact Jessica Collier at 891-2600 ext. 26 or jcollier@adirondackdailyenterprise.com.

 
 

 

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