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Lake Placid students to build outdoor classroom

Space will include flowers spelling out ‘LPHS’

June 6, 2013
By JESSICA COLLIER - Staff Writer (jcollier@adirondackdailyenterprise.com) , Adirondack Daily Enterprise

LAKE PLACID - Lake Placid High School students plan to build an outdoor classroom, complete with a garden with flowers planted in the shape of the letters "LPHS."

High school senior Hunter Wilson presented his idea for the garden sign to the school board at their Tuesday night meeting. It will be his senior project.

He said he originally wanted to spell out "Bombers," but he recently decided with his mentor to change the letters.

Article Photos

Lake Placid High School senior Hunter Wilson tells the school board about the garden he plans to plant that will spell out the letters “LPHS.”
(Enterprise photo — Jessica Collier)

The senior class gave Wilson about $1,000 to complete his vision. He plans to use just one type of flower, alyssum, which he said should keep the costs down.

He has talked with Tammy Morgan and the school's environmental club about that group maintaining the planting in the future.

Wilson said he hopes to have the garden completed by next Tuesday.

School board President Mary Dietrich said that a big part of the school's senior projects is to do something that will build a long-lasting tradition.

"Yeah, I want to leave a mark on the school," Wilson told the board.

"It should look nice out there," school board member Phil Bambach said as the board approved the two projects later in the meeting.

Wilson's project will be attached to the outdoor classroom that several other students plan to build as part of Morgan's advanced placement environmental class.

Board member Herb Stoerr jokingly said the board should meet outside, and board member Patti Gallagher picked up on the idea, saying the board should hold a meeting in the outdoor classroom when it's completed.

"That's an excellent idea," Gallagher said.

Dietrich said the students got the idea from Richard Louv, a national writer who advocates for children experiencing the outdoors, and the Adirondack Youth Climate Summit at The Wild Center.

 
 

 

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