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Vitriol over moose may have deeper meaning

October 2, 2012
Adirondack Daily Enterprise

To the editor:

We are so fortunate to live in a community that values the life of the wild critters in our midst, people who will speak for and tend to abused animals who cannot speak for themselves. This is a very positive thing.

I am concerned, however about the vitriol directed towards the DEC in the matter of the moose. It seems a bit like "Thou protesteth too much"; like there is an underlying emotional need that is being satisfied by attacking the DEC that has little to do with the moose, but a lot to do with the frustrations and stress our vulnerable community members feel at this difficult time. Did the moose in his helplessness represent the feelings of the people? The moose was clearly hurt or sick, alone and defenseless. I think people identified with it.

I think when one identifies strongly with a helpless innocent, be it animal or child, the manner in which they will perceive events will be colored by this feeling, i.e., they killed the poor moose, they didn't try to help it, there was so much they could have done to help but they took the easy way out and shot it because they didn't care and they just wanted the problem to go away. At this time, living in this political climate, this economy many feel as helpless as a sick moose. They are struggling so hard and no one cares. The authorities don't help. All authority is to be despised. Since one can't attack all authority because one has no power, this "small authority," the DEC who destroyed this weak powerless creature will be a good target for venting frustration.

It's just that when I see a bunch of people getting really mean and not thinking about the facts, when I see vicious attacks, then it's a red flag for me that something else is going on.

In this case, my opinion is the DEC did the right thing. Either that moose had Meningal worm (brain worm) or he was injured. Several humans were at great risk of injury because of this sick animal, either directly from the moose or from traffic accidents ... but the facts specific to this case aren't really what is important.

We need to find more ways to address the feelings of helplessness, frustration and fear so many in our community feel.

Just my take on this.

Trudy Rosenblum

Jay

 
 

 

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